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What You Need To Know About The Oral-Systemic Relationship

By: | Tags: , , , , | Comments: 0 | June 24th, 2016

shutterstock_230098735Many people today assume oral health involves little more than healthy teeth and gums. This is not true at all. There are clear relationships between oral health and general health. When you become familiar with the oral systemic relationship, it can be your first step to a healthier mouth and a healthier body.

Oral Health And Your Body

Oral issues cause bacteria to remain in your mouth. This bacteria enters your bloodstream, and travels throughout your body. This process can significantly increase your risk of many serious health problems.

Common health problems associated with oral bacteria include rheumatoid arthritis, neck and head cancers, stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure, kidney and pancreatic cancers, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease.

There are special concerns for pregnant women. Women who have gum disease are at a high risk of delivering low-birth-weight babies, and increasing risks to their unborn child’s health.
Why You Should Take Your Oral Health Seriously:

80% or more of adults in the United States have gum disease. If you are not yet experiencing bleeding gums or other symptoms, you may not even realize you have gum disease. If this is the case, you are endangering your health. In addition to tooth loss, you may develop a serious or life-threatening medical condition that is otherwise unnecessary.
What You Can Do To Protect Your Health:

Dental tips for home oral care can make a difference. A healthy diet, and daily flossing and brushing can be a start to better health. However, there are additional steps you can take for oral health. Routine cleanings and exams are essential. At your next routine visit, ask your dentist for an OralDNA saliva test.

It is a simple, painless test that can determine your level of risk, and will help your dentist determine the best treatment for your particular situation.

You can have whole-body health and wellness. The way to start is with a visit to your dentist. You will have the opportunity to ask questions, and learn more about the oral systemic relationship. You can have a lifetime of oral health, and a healthier body, too.